Avalon Drive South to Norton School-Mall Walking / Biking

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The artistic quality of the Livingstone Ave / Avalon roundabout is interesting. The functionality of the roundabout is limited to motor vehicles. The designer forgot to include crossings for pedestrians, and for people new to biking, the roads are giving mixed signals on where the desire lines should be. There are on-road cycle lanes that will mix people new to biking with motor vehicles, potentially leading cyclists to think they have right of way.

The nearest pedestrian crossing to the Livingstone / Avalon roundabout is 120m north, which is a good place to have a pedestrian island-type crossing as it is close to the alley-way through to Vernall Street / Nawton Domain.  The image below proposes to provide pedestrian crossings on all arms of the roundabout, connected to a shared-use path for pedestrians and people new to biking. It also includes a mix of on-road and protected cycle lanes along Avalon Drive.

There is an opportunity to have a more people-friendly slow street network with lower speed intersections in the area between Ellicott Rd and Grandview Rd, with Livingstone Avenue being the central route. The main motor vehicle routes to Norton Mall are along Grandview Rd and Hyde Ave, and there is no need for motor vehicle traffic to use Livingstone Ave as a through route.  

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Linking Avalon Drive North to Dominion Road Walking / Biking

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Like the Mangaharakeke Drive / Wintec Rotokauri to Rotokauri Station / the Base (Te Awa) link and the Wairere Drive rail overbridge, which do not connect for people new to biking, the wide shared path along Mangaharakeke Drive stops before Avalon Drive. The image below shows how the shared path could start to be extended into Avalon Drive.

Shared paths are not a solution everywhere, but where we do have them, safe shared paths, like other shared spaces, need to have appropriate speeds to allow for people walking, scootering, biking and e-biking, with faster modes giving pedestrians and slower modes right of way.

The image above shows on-road cycle lanes for the heavier e-bikers and faster commuters, who can travel at about 30 km/h. It would be a good idea to lower the speed on Avalon Drive to one closer to the speed of e-bike users. The image is not suggesting having people ride bikes around Mangaharakeke roundabout. It does expect the shared paths to be about 4 metres wide and have a 1-metre obstacle-free shoulder each side.

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